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Major Joint or Bursal Injections

Major Joint or Bursal Injections

Major joints in the body (i.e., shoulder, hip, knee) are frequently prone to arthritis as we age. Arthritic joints become inflamed, painful, and stiff. In addition to oral medications like nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAID’s) or topical ointments, the joints can be injected with corticosteroid to decrease inflammation and allow for greater ease of movement without pain. Typically, joints can be injected without the use of dye, X-ray, or ultrasound for needle guidance, but imaging techniques may be used to ensure proper needle placement. The area around the joint is sterilized and the joint is injected with either corticosteroid alone or with the addition of local anesthetic. Patients are free to resume normal activity following the injection. Typically, a major joint can only be injected with steroid 3-4 times in a year.

Bursa are fluid filled sacs that line the inside of joints, acting as a lubricant. Bursitiis is when the bursa become inflamed, which typically occurs with arthritis. Bursa injections are similar to joint injections and occur in the same manner. Typically, bursa can be injected without the use of dye, X-ray, or ultrasound for needle guidance, but imaging techniques may be used to ensure proper needle placement. The area around the bursa is sterilized and the bursa is injected with either corticosteroid alone or with the addition of local anesthetic. Patients are free to resume normal activity following the injection. Typically, a bursa can only be injected with steroid 3-4 times in a year.